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5 things to consider when Reshoring – Skills

Can you find the skills necessary to reshore manufacturing into the highly efficient and automated factory floors of the US?

As your manufacturing was outsourced your internal skill ladder continued to shrink. Skilled jobs followed the production capability offshore.  Add the offshored jobs and skills to the need for new skills in highly automated manufacturing and many organizations face serious skill shortages. In an earlier Blog, “5 things to consider when Reshoring”, we identified skills as a critical element in your manufacturing location decisions.  In today’s blog we will consider how to address the skills you need.

Shrinking skill ladders

In the past many people obtained their marketable skills on the job. Companies promoted from within enabling workers to learn and move up career ladders as workers gained skills and experience.  As manufacturing was slowly offshored over the past 20 years, the system that had ensured an adequate flow of new talent equipped with state-of-the-art skills was lost as few new skilled workers entered the US workplace.

Add to this the skill loss from the retirement of older workers and the know-how simply may not exist in the US anymore. This is particularly true for entry-level and mid-level jobs that require specialized labor. In deliberating reshoring you should consider the potential need to import certain skilled workers and will certainly need to develop training programs for specific jobs, possibly with local colleges and technical schools.

Education

The factories of today and the future for made-in-America products are focused largely on progressive technologies to deliver new manufacturing techniques and produce goods efficiently. The future is highly automated machines with fewer, but higher skilled, workers. The new factory skills require computer oriented, specialized training to master highly automated machines and robots as well as 3D design and visualization. Supporting this advanced manufacturing environment will require additional technical jobs to program and service these machines. Skills such as welding or milling will still be required but will be complimented by a 2-year or higher degree requirement that includes areas such as CAD and 3D operations.

The educational bar will only get higher as technological sophistication of manufacturing continues to increase. Postsecondary technical education and college training or degrees will be required t