Exchanging Ideas - Argument And Debate Concept

Reshoring Institute Intern Series – Ivan Reed

The Intersection of Manufacturing and Politics in the 2016 Elections

We’ve all heard speeches about great things that will be achieved by incoming candidates running for office. They promise the creation of new jobs and the rebuilding of the economy. But, whatever happens to those goals?

As a relative newcomer to the nationwide political scene, President Obama swept the American public away with his vision of hope for the future. During one of his early speeches, he announced that he would help to create one million new manufacturing jobs by the time he left office in 2017 (American Made). This would be great for the economy, but a hefty goal by any observer’s account.

Currently, we are about halfway there in terms of jobs created (AMA), with only sixteen  months  to go, it looks like the pace of job creation is not as high as was expected. This is problematic because job growth is a clear indicator of economic growth. If the economy is not doing well, then the incumbents may be in trouble – and not just the individuals that make tough claims, but for all elected officials and representatives.

In 2008, the economy was headed towards disaster due in part to 2.6 million-job losses that year during the Republican control of the Whitehouse.  It was no surprise when the Democrats took control, including “safe seats” in the House and Senate.  The American public was looking for change and Obama promised he would be the man to do it.

If the past is any indicator, the importance that promises are kept by political leaders, and the perception of strength in jobs and the economy drive election results.  Americans are demanding that more